At some point in your life, you’ve been told that an opportunity will show up when you least expect it. It’s when you’re not looking for the perfect person, financial opportunity, or answer that what you need will reveal itself. This same idea applies to your career. Below, three ways are outlined to position yourself for the ideal job you didn’t know you wanted (with added words of wisdom from Kenny Rogers).


Curate your job history. Know when to hold ‘em, know when to fold ‘em.

Take a look at your resume. Have you made strides in your professional career? Have you achieved measurable success? When you’ve reached a place of stasis, have you sought out more challenges? New jobs? For that matter, when was the last time you spent some quality time with your resume? It might not be a bad idea to check out PeopleSuite’s blog from last April – “5 Resume Mistakes to Avoid.” Your resume should shine whether or not you’re actively seeking out a new career.


Build your skill sets. If you’re gonna play the game, you gotta learn to play it right.

I’m guessing you’re pretty good at your job. You handle your responsibilities seriously, and you are dependable and efficient. Given your level of knowledge, are you taking steps to keep your brain in top condition? Keeping your brain active is a great way to stay healthy. Have a thirst for knowledge. Look for where you can improve. Is there a class you can take? Does your company offer training programs for building additional computer skills or enhancing your interpersonal communication? Always, always seek to learn more when you have the time and mental capacity to do so.


Be open and approachable. I’ve made a life outta reading people’s faces.

It goes without saying that in order to attract anything, you need to be open to receiving it. Elaine Erickson even wrote a blog post highlighting how organizations as a whole can improve their images for potential candidates. This goes both ways. Whether you acknowledge it or not, you are always networking. How you treat others is noticed. A recruiter is more likely to reach out to a potential candidate who is consistently showing up, listening, and willing to share their story.


Final Thoughts:

One of the industries we work with is aerospace and defense. Those job can be extremely niche and require a very specific type of candidate. We have learned that quite often, the best candidate is one who isn’t actively looking for a job, especially when it comes to a specialized field. But even if you’re not a rocket scientist, the tips shared above can still open doors for you that you didn’t know existed. Who knows, maybe you’ll get a tailored email later today presenting a job opportunity worth exploring. Will you be ready for it when it happens?

 

 

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